Europol Study: Disclosure of electronic evidence often fails due to incompetence of authorities

The planned EU e-Evidence regulation is intended to force Internet service providers to cooperate more with police and judicial authorities. However, a survey shows that the companies already comply with their requests voluntarily. But they are often incorrect and thus rejected.

The police from Germany, France and Great Britain request by far the most data from Internet service providers. This is the result of a study by the SIRIUS project, which Europol has published on its website. 38% of all requests (67,991) come from German authorities. Although the so-called G6 countries (Germany, France, the UK, Poland, Spain and Italy) represent half of the EU population, their authorities are responsible for around 90% of crossborder internet surveillance activities.

The SIRIUS platform located at the police agency Europol in The Hague is intended to facilitate the exchange of knowledge on electronic evidence. Via a secure connection, authorities in all EU member states can obtain information on how to query Internet service providers. This applies to traffic, user and content data, which are released in different ways. SIRIUS also contains instructions for „Open Source Internet Searches“ (OSINT) and for conducting queries on user data from various service providers. This enables the persons behind IP addresses or mail accounts to be determined. „Europol Study: Disclosure of electronic evidence often fails due to incompetence of authorities“ weiterlesen

EU surveillance state

The EU is increasing the surveillance in its Member States. US authorities could soon also wiretap legally in Europe

The new European Parliament is to be constituted in September, after which the EU Commission will be re-elected. The governments of the member states use this phase to put far-reaching surveillance measures on track. This week the Justice and Home Affairs Ministers debated this on their Council meeting in Luxembourg.

Data retention is right at the top of the agenda. EU-wide, Internet and telephone providers are to be forced to store data on customers and their communications for years. If necessary, these could later be queried by police authorities or secret services. Although the European Union adopted a corresponding directive in 2006, it was declared invalid ten years later by the European Court of Justice (ECJ). As a result, many member states issued national regulations that differ in the depth of intervention or storage period. „EU surveillance state“ weiterlesen

US authorities want to legally intercept telecommunications in Europe

The FBI could soon demand sensitive communication data from European Internet service providers. It would also be possible to have the data retrieved in real time. With this, the European Union wants to make the Trump administration weigh the possibility of being able to query „electronic evidence“ on Facebook & Co.

The EU Commission wants to negotiate an agreement with the US government that forces Internet providers based in the European Union to cooperate more with US authorities. The companies would have to grant police forces and secret services from the USA access to the communication of their users. European prosecutors would then also be able to issue an identical order directly to Facebook, Apple and other Internet giants. The legal process via the judicial authorities that has been customary up to now is to be dropped. „US authorities want to legally intercept telecommunications in Europe“ weiterlesen

European Commission wants to facilitate access to servers in third states

Police and judicial authorities are to have easier access to cloud data in the USA. To this end, a decree of the US government will also apply in the EU member states. As part of the „Budapest Convention“, US authorities could also knock directly on the door of European Internet companies.

The European Commission has today submitted two negotiating mandates for easier data retrieval from Internet companies. Their purpose is to facilitate access to „electronic evidence“ in the US. This is also possible via the EU-US Mutual Legal Assistance Agreement or bilateral mutual recognition procedures. However, this existing international legal process takes up to 10 months. But allegedly, the EU member states only make use of this laborious procedure in around 4,000 cases a year. „European Commission wants to facilitate access to servers in third states“ weiterlesen