German Presidency: G7 countries support EU policy on chat control

In Eltville in November, the G7 interior ministers want to put pressure on internet companies to use filter technologies to detect sexual abuse and grooming of children. The driver is Great Britain, which is leading the way with a new law. Encryption is also affected.

On May 11, 2022, the EU Commission presented its proposal for a regulation to combat child abuse. This contains numerous obligations for Internet service providers, including measures to assess and minimize the risk of the spread of sexual abuse and grooming. If this risk is assessed as „high,“ authorities can issue so-called detection orders. Companies must then deploy filtering technologies that, as it stands now, will also block out encrypted communications.

The proposal, which the Commission drafted after repeated requests from the Council of 27 EU member states, will be discussed for the first time at the informal Justice and Home Affairs Council in Prague on Monday. In the Internet civil society, the plan, dubbed „chat control,“ is facing widespread opposition. The EU governments are now getting support from the G7 countries, whose heads of government addressed the issue at their summit in Elmau a week ago. Under the German G7 presidency, the interior ministers were subsequently tasked with taking measures. „German Presidency: G7 countries support EU policy on chat control“ weiterlesen

European Commission wants to facilitate access to servers in third states

Police and judicial authorities are to have easier access to cloud data in the USA. To this end, a decree of the US government will also apply in the EU member states. As part of the „Budapest Convention“, US authorities could also knock directly on the door of European Internet companies.

The European Commission has today submitted two negotiating mandates for easier data retrieval from Internet companies. Their purpose is to facilitate access to „electronic evidence“ in the US. This is also possible via the EU-US Mutual Legal Assistance Agreement or bilateral mutual recognition procedures. However, this existing international legal process takes up to 10 months. But allegedly, the EU member states only make use of this laborious procedure in around 4,000 cases a year. „European Commission wants to facilitate access to servers in third states“ weiterlesen